Obama or Romney: who is better for Australia?

Obama or Romney: who is better for Australia?

TODAY, those US citizens who choose to vote go to the polls. Having spent the last few weeks in America (and getting out of New York just in the nick of time) I have come to the opinion that American politics is far less of a circus than Australian politics.
Australia could learn a great deal from the way in which the run up to the election is conducted. It must also brace itself for the change to come – no matter who wins.
There are those of us, particularly in business, who are looking forward to the outcome, but also to the end of the campaign. The finality of this campaign means that companies – nationally and globally – can get on with the day to day running of their business with less uncertainty.
What is uncertain at the moment is whose policies will affect us: Republican or Democrat?
Leaning towards one Party isn’t as clear-cut as it seems.
Even though the Bush Junior Administration caused many to detest the Republican Party, the current reality is Mitt Romney will be economically far better for the US and better – indirectly – for Australia.
Romney is a successful businessmen; he understands that if entrepreneurs aren’t incentivised there won’t be money for social services. He wants Americans to be accountable and responsible for their lives – which many politicians seek, but few have the courage to make policy.
The reality is whoever becomes President is usually so hamstrung that very little difference or progress can be made.
Obama is the greatest living proof of someone who has been hamstrung. Obama’s reign is proof that the current political system adopted by western societies is deeply flawed, outdated and needs overhauling. It has to be brought into the 21st Century to better serve its citizens.
Obama came to office with great intent and dedication; he had a huge groundswell of support to create change and make America a better country.
However he has been disappointing. No doubt he inherited a mess, but he has been unable to turn things around.
I’m tipping Obama to win because America hasn’t undergone enough pain under his regime. They may be cynical towards him, but they will endure another four years in the hope that he is able to bring the change he first promised.
Given another term, Obama must change his economic policies. His current over the top social-welfare agenda will continue to cripple the economy. If he is re-elected and continues with his current program, America’s debt will continue to rise.
The incumbent must eliminate Government waste(meaning smaller, much more efficient Government leading to better services not less) and stimulate the economy by incentivising business to employ more people without the fear of being further taxed.
The same is true for all economies.
Australia unlike America can’t afford another Gillard government term. The damaging economic effects of this government will be felt for a long time; another year of flawed economic policy will do even more damage.
The challenge in Australian politics is to focus less on the individual and more on policy.
Like the US, whoever is our next Prime Minister will be voted in because they are disliked the least
That’s not an intelligent way to decide our economic future.
Australia is doing well more by good fortune then good management, yet this allows many naive politicians and a naive electorate to be fooled by governments claiming credit for the state of our economy (Swan ignores the fact he inherited a $70 billion dollar surplus and turned it into a $250 billion deficit).
Unless political systems are updated and citizens are able to vote directly on policy, we will see little progress, a lot of wasted effort and frustrated voters.
Do we have to go through so much pain before we change? Or can we influence politicians to elevate their thinking above self-interest and get on with creating a better society via stronger political and education systems.
Romney, Obama, Gillard or Abbott, it doesn’t matter.
The political landscape is unlikely to change no matter who wins today or whoever gets the nod next year.
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